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the european union. i do going the way of european parliament for an eu able to meet the challenges and you need to come out and say that quite clear as your fellow citizens. mr. president of the republic. [applause] [speaking french] >> translator: i want to thank you for having got the budget treaty ratified in parliament because that's a good sign for europe, but i looked long and hard. i don't see what's happened to your 120 billion euros. where have those billions gone, mr. president? please tell us. we are legislators. and we are men and women of goodwill, but we have a responsibility to our fellow citizens. we get here to talk, teen ago she, you need to know that there are points which we won't give ground on. first of all, there is the question of flexibility. we need to have genuine flexibility in the financial framework between budget alliance and between news. that's how we have managed to run the budget properly in the context of austerity and balanced budget. second, own resource but if the european budget is going to be financed properly, it will allow us to reduce the contrib
the prospect of having to bail out failed banks and eu governments for perhaps years to come. they are still asking why no charges have been brought in the interest rate fixing scandal among top level banks. >> now, the german finance minister is set to present proposals to address that anger that will include a tightening of banking regulations. germany is not the only european country planning new laws against the reckless bankers that cost taxpayers billions. >> and number of european governments are drawing up new measures to prevent big banks from passing on the costs of high risk trading to taxpayers. in germany, a new draft law is due to be presented to the cabinet on wednesday. the proposed law would require major banks to separate their retail and investment banking. it also outlines plans for restructuring and liquidation in the event of a crisis, and bank executives are engaged -- who engage in reckless behavior could face up to five years in prison, and britain is also bound to pressure to rein in the excesses' of the system in the wake of the libor scandal and breaches of money
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)